Four Advantages of Deep Frying

Deep frying is a method of cooking that involves submerging food in deep oils or fats at high temperatures. There are several reasons why someone would want to use this method of cooking. First and foremost, it seals in the taste and tenderness of the food to help it maintain its flavor and moisture. Also you can cook food quickly in a deep fryer. The consensus on deep fried food is that it can be some of the most delicious and tender food you can eat. Restaurants love using deep frying because their customers love the food and they can churn out dishes quickly. Let’s look at the most common advantages of deep frying when compared to other methods of cooking.

1. Speed of Cooking

You can could food much faster with deep frying than you can with other methods. The basic laws of thermodynamics state that heat transfer between a hot liquid and solid food occurs much quicker than it does from heated air to a solid food. The larger and more dense the food you are cooking, the more you will see this effect realized. Let’s take a large, thirty pound Thanksgiving turkey for instance. To cook that in an oven, it would take eight hours. In a deep fryer, you can cut your cooking time down to an hour or less. So the time difference it takes to cook something in a deep fryer versus convention methods is significant.

2. Improved Taste of Food

Food that is cooked in a deep fryer always tastes better than food cooked on a stove or in the oven. This is because the surrounding fats or oils do a better job of sealing in the flavor during deep fry cooking. The oils and fats often add a delicious flavor themselves to the food during the cooking process.

3. More Tenderness of Food

This I think is the primary reason why people love to deep fry their foods. Foods that are overcooked in the oven tend to dry out, and eating food that is dry and overcooked is certainly an unpleasant experience, especially when you are looking forward to a tasty meal. With a deep fryer there is no worry of this occurring. If you happen to cook food in a deep fryer longer than necessary, it will still retain its moisture. You can be sure to have a tender meal when it is cooked in the deep fryer.

4. Makes Great Appetizers and Desserts

Deep frying is ideal for making a variety of foods in a style that is most appealing. When you go out to a restaurant and order an appetizer, you know what I’m talking about. Appetizers are what I usually look forward to the most when eating out. Chances are the appetizers you crave the most are deep fried. At home, you can cook a variety of foods and tasty treats with deep frying that you can’t with other methods. Here are some foods that are ideal for deep frying:

  • Friend fries
  • Onion rings
  • Cheese fritters
  • Mozzarella sticks
  • Fried fish sticks
  • Fried chicken tenders or cutlets
  • Scotch eggs
  • Fried zucchini disks
  • Potato chips
  • Doughnuts
  • Banana or pineapple fritters
  • Fried Mexican ice cream
  • Friend pastries

So these are the main advantages of using your deep fryer to do your cooking. If you want to cook food quicker that is more tender and has more flavor, than you should break out the old deep fryer or invest in a new one. Once you experience foods cooked in the deep fryer, it’s hard to go back to the other convention ways of cooking.



Source by Martin Gandhi

What Do Swans Eat – 4 Food Options If You Plan on Feeding Swan

Are you planning to raise some swans in your garden pond? In getting started, it is helpful to know first the basic details about swans so you can effectively raise and breed them successfully. For first time breeders or swan raisers, the food that swans mostly eat is a mystery for them. Some people are thinking that they feed on formulated feeds just like chickens and other birds. Actually, they are generally herbivorous, but there are some species that also eat insects and small aquatic animals. Being familiar with what do swans eat is crucial especially for people who plans to raise them in an artificial or man-made environment, as their usual foods are not naturally occurring.

So what do swans eat? The following are the common foods that most swans eat:

• Aquatic Plants – since swans spend most of their time in bodies of water like ponds and lakes, they also source out their food from here. They usually feed on stems, roots, leaves, tubers and other parts of any aquatic plants. This is not a problem for swan raised on natural bodies of water; however, people that raise their swans in man-made ponds or lakes must ensure that aquatic plants are present to serve as the swan’s food.

• Insects – swans also wander on land and they can eat whatever small insect that may come into their way. This includes snails, aquatic beetles and many more. This is the intriguing part about what do swans eat; at first people thought that swans are purely herbivorous but as time passes by, it was discovered that swans also feed on small insects.

• Small Aquatic Animals – this includes shrimps, small fishes and other small aquatic animals. These aquatic animals are eaten by fully mature swans living in a natural pond or lake.

• Grains and Vegetables – this is the usual food for domesticated swans, especially those that are raised on farms. Swans on captivity feed on corns and other grains as well as on left over vegetable scraps.

With the mentioned facts, you now have idea about what do swans eat. In raising swans, make sure to provide them with a continuous supply of food, as they may wander away if their needs are not sustained. Don’t be confused about what do swans eat; there are a variety of food options where you can choose from. Providing them food is also a way to tame them, so don’t forget to regularly assist them in their foods!



Source by Andrew Grey

How to Win a Food Fight Battle With an Autistic Child

How to Win a Food Fight Battle in Ten Steps

For the first time in the history, overweight and obesity are increasingly prevalent in the general pediatric population. According to the American Association of Pediatrics, evidence suggests that children with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) may be at even higher elevated risk for unhealthy weight gain, with differences present as early as ages 2 to 5 years. To make matters worse, these results clearly indicated that the prevalence of unhealthy weight is significantly greater among children with ASD compared with the general population.

A study published in 2008, by The U.S Library of Medicine’s National Institution on Health, listed childhood obesity as a culprit – affecting nearly one-third of the U.S. children, and the prevalence of these conditions has increased at least four-fold since the 1970s.

Obesity in ASD may be particularly problematic for a variety of reasons. First, core symptoms of ASD may be naturally related to weight problems: for instance, children with ASD may lack social motivation to participate in family meals or in structured physical activities with other children and those parents may be more likely to use food as a reward in children with ASD due to lack of social motivation. The severity or type of a child’s symptoms may also affect his or her ability to participate in physical activities that might mitigate weight gain. Still, little is known about the prevalence that correlates to overweight youth and among children with Autism Spectrum Disorder. Today, it is still unclear whether risk factors for obesity in ASD are the same or different from risk factors for children generally.

Living in a world of processed and high caloric food choices – today, more than ever, it is important that we all start to pay closer attention to what our children are eating and when. Easier said than done. Right?

Good nutrition and children with autism rarely go hand in hand easily. Often, parents who are responsible for mealtimes within a ASD family – concentrate what the neuro-normality world does not. ASD Parents live with higher demonstrations of restricted eating, and repetitive behavior patterns with food. ASD parents are also faced with a higher intake of low-nutrition, energy-dense foods. Parents usually give in, and pick their battles elsewhere. Can’t say that I blame them. I’ve done it myself.

But to make things more stressful, we all knowit all stops here, with us – the parents.

As if our jobs are not hard enough, we add a picky or selective eater to our daunting-ever-growing line-up of duties. Somedays it seems as though we will never win the food fight battle, let alone score a few points in our favor.

For many parents, loading healthy nutrition into your picky or selective eaters diet will always be source of a meal time battle. Because Autism affects each child uniquely, we all need to run our own battery of food testing on our own child. For some children it’s all about sensory issues – which can make introducing new and nutritious foods extremely hard for parents. If that isn’t complicated enough, dealing with children who like repetition and routines each day, provides another interesting challenge. Oral sensitivity issues can also make this difficult situation worse.

If you are a new parent of an ASD child, or a seasoned ASD parent, but need to make a nutritional change – please ask your doctor before starting any new food regiments. Most ASD families find going gluten and casein free really helps. Lose fast-food as quickly as you can. Try to stay dye-free and offer organic, minimally processed food replacements. Make this part of the whole families repertoire. Read labels. Cook at home any chance you have. Avoid highly proceeded foods at all costs.

Identifying food allergies. If children are reacting certain foods, pay close attention to this. Usually, if a child reject a certain food – it’s because the body is speaking. Your child’s body will naturally reject certain foods for a myriad of reasons. Pay close attention to those cues. Maybe your child is pressing his belly against the dinner table. This might signal a belly-ache. Whatever is causing these reactions, – these food should stay off the menu forever. Your child’s body will naturally attacks a food it identifies as harmful, causing symptoms such as nausea, stomach pain, intestinal integrity, shortness of breath, hives. With food intolerance, the digestive system alone rejects the food, finding it difficult to digest properly. Follow the food cues.

Think back on what your child repetitively eats. Maybe it’s a fast food item. Something before you realized it’s time for a change. Identify that item. Begin to build other foods to look like it. The shape, as well as the color. Example: Making homemade organic baked chicken tenderloins shorter and breaded in GF breadcrumbs to look like the fast food chicken nuggets you are trying to wean him off. Take all the time you need. Make sure this process is moving at the speed your child is absorbing the solution. Take each step a day at a time or once a week – on the same day each week.

Always prepare your child and NEVER lie or be deceitful and sneaky about food – this approach can create more challenges for you down the road and not only about food, but trust issues. If you are hiding food within the recipe – tell them, just select the right time – and that certainly is not before they eat it.

How to Introduce a New Food to a Selective Eater.

  1. Start a food journal. Inside the food journal, build a list containing two columns. In the first column list the foods that your child enjoys eating. Use the other column, to list a healthier alternative for each food listed in the first column. Keep another list on the dates the foods where offered.
  2. Remember, children are always watching and listening, even if you think they are not. Your families words and actions can make or break just about anything. Spread the message among the family members regarding your new food-fight strategy.
  3. Eat the desired new food while sitting next to your child and comment, how delicious the food tastes while you have your child’s attention, and the child is observing you eating and enjoying the new food. Remember – if you are not eating it, don’t expect your child to.
  4. Inflict Peer Pressure. Have a friend of the child, or a highly reinforcing person eat the food next to the child and make positive comments. Again, make sure your child is actually paying close attention.
  5. During therapy, downtime or homework hour. Place a photo of the desired food into the mix of whatever the child is working on. Make the food photo like a visual, tactile flashcard. Not a photo from your phone. One photo flashcard for each new food. Use one at a time or a few depending on your child. You know your child’s tolerance levels best. Play a flashcard game. Look at the food picture, and talk about the new food. The foods name, what it tastes like, and how delicious it is. Where it comes from, and who else eats it.
  6. When you have cycled through a few flashcard activities, add the actual real food to the flashcard line up. Just touch it, look at it, feel it and discuss how delicious it tastes. Include discussing ways of how people cook and eating the new food. Describe and identify textures.
  7. Once you have cycled through the flashcard game enough times, and the child has actually seen the new food, now is the time to place a small amount of the new food on a plate close by to the child’s plate during family meal times. Point to the new food and discuss it. Talk about how delicious it is, and allow the child to see you eat it, and enjoy it. Do not make the child touch or eat the food.
  8. Place a small amount of the new food on the child’s plate with his regular meal. Make sure this is a not a surprise and create a no pressure zone. Tell the child ahead you are putting the new food on the plate – using the name of the food, and telling the child they do not have to eat the new food, but they need to tolerate the food sitting on his plate during the course of the mealtime.
  9. Place the same food item on the child’s plate and during mealtimes, tell the child he needs to touch the food. Tell the child they do not have to eat the food, it just needs to be touched with a finger once during the mealtime.
  10. Continue the process until the food is tasted. Remain patience.The process of adding a new repertoire of foods won’t happen over night, but it will happen.

By the end of a four, to eight month period, depending on your child – you might have them eating many foods from the new, healthy food list column you originally designed – including organic a grass fed, nitrate free hamburger meats, new, healthier variations of chicken or fresh fish nuggets, and lots of real fruits and vegetables in their natural form.

Each child is different. Be patient – in the long run, you and your family will find peace of mind that you will eventually be free from all the additional health issues associated the negative aspects of eating highly processed foods.

Peaceful Parenting,

Chef Gigi



Source by Gigi Gaggero

How To Find The Right Dog Food

For those with dogs, food is among the biggest needs that must be well taken care of. Your furry friend has nutritional requirements that should be met. Of course, you would want to strike a balance between providing food that he likes and food that is good for him.

Today, you will be overwhelmed by the many dog food options in the market today. To help you determine the best options and fully understand the importance of good food, experts have shared some tips for buying the right dog food.

A Simple Guide To Buying Food For Dogs

Feed by nature – Dogs before were wild so they mainly eat live animals. This means that they consume raw animal meat and bones, organs, tissues, and hair. They also consume plant matter in small amounts. But today, domesticated dogs have evolved to be carnivorous, while also eating those fit for omnivores.

Puppy to adult – Puppies certainly need to feed on their mother’s milk, similar to any kind of mammal. At approximately 8-12 weeks of life, they will start weaning off the milk and begin eating solid food. As your puppy becomes an adult, you will find that there are different kinds of food that they must eat to ensure good health. It is highly recommended that you take your pet to a reliable vet to gain valuable advice regarding good food to feed him based on his health status, age, and specific conditions.

Home-prepared or commercial pet food – Most pet owners are often faced with 2 options. You can either feed the dog raw or cooked meats or with commercial pet food from the store. Choosing which kind of food to give him will depend on the dog’s specific requirements.

Bear in mind that no two dogs will have similar dietary needs. Hence, it is very important for you to consult your vet about the right diet to follow. You will know that your pet is eating right if he has a normal energy level and appetite, fresh breath, clean teeth and ears, a glossy coat, no elimination issues, not itching, and an overall good disposition and attitude. If your dog is healthy, you will see that he is very happy.

Some Foods To Avoid

As much as you want your pet to eat nutritious food that he truly enjoys eating, you need to be very careful in not giving him foods that can be toxic. Some of the food you must not give your pet will include garlic, avocado, chocolate, raisins and grapes, coffee or any product with caffeine, citrus fruits, mushrooms, corn cobs, green or unripe tomatoes, salt and seasonings, and nuts.



Source by Cristina Gandia

Exclusively Festive Food in Festive Seasons

In colorful India we have a huge variety of foods that people consume every day, different food in different time. Starting from North to south we come across thousands of foods across the country. The most interesting part is the dishes prepared in the festive season, it’s almost every day celebrated.

The celebration season is throughout the year in India;

Sankranti it’s a Harvest festival, especial laddu of Jaggery, roasted Sesame seed and roasted peanut are mixed and blended into laddu’s.

Pongal is the South Indian version of Sankrati the first rice of this season is prepared with Jaggery and Raisins.

GudiPadva/Ugadi (Hindu new year) Crushed Neem leaves is consumed with Jaggery, it has magical effect on our belly, it’s taken in a very small portion.

Holi Festival of color, special Karanji a curved shaped Khoya (reduced dry milk) and dry fruits stuffed in a wheat dove pockets and deep fried and Malpua preparation of wheat pancakes in syrup.

Baisakhi harvesting season in Punjab Mustard leaf vegetable and Roti made from Corn flour and special Punjabi Lassi made of Yoghurt, Buttermilk and sugar.

Rakshabandhan A threads relation between Brother and Sister. In this festival sister prepare sweets according to their brother’s choice, e.g., Gulabjamun a mix of Khoya balls, fried in clarified butter and dipped in syrup.

Janmastami The Birthday of Lord Krishna a special powder is prepared by dry ginger powder with sugar powder and coriander powder are blended together and eaten this has a curative effect on our digestive system, Butter and Rock Sugar.

Ganeshchaturthi a special offering to Lord Ganesha is Modak a dry fruit mix with sugar and coconut.

Onam in Kerala it’s the main festival of harvest Aavial,Pachadi, Rassam, payasam are some main dishes.

Muharram Haleem is prepared by the Muslims in India.

Dussehra this is the festival of victory over evil a large range of menu is being prepared all over India.

Diwali is famous for recipes like Laddu, gujiya, Namkeen pare, Chivda, Shakkar pare and hundreds of recipes in this festival.

Christmas a special month of Christians and special Christmas cake and many more dishes are done in India.

The Indians wait all the yearlong to enjoy the festival and the rich food made for this occasion. The food varies from state to state and area to area, the most interesting thing is the food offered to the God is usually sweet; Lots of sweets are consumed during this period, there are some scientific reasons behind the food that are being prepared during this festive season. The climatic conditions and the food consumed are perfect blend to improve our health at festive time. Some dishes are done once in a year during the festive season, people eagerly wait for a whole year. It has great effect on our appetite and digestive system too. The whole arena is full of life and people are more excited during the festival, all castes and creeds enjoy the company of each other. It’s the time when heavenly powers are showered on you and you would not like to miss a chance.

Let it be a Hindu, a Muslim or the Christian, Sikhs or Jain, all come together to celebrate the festival and enjoy the company of each other.

There is unity in diversity in India.



Source by Hema Dalvi

Keeping Your Camping Food Hot – Top 5 Tips To Keep It Nice And Warm

There is nothing quite like being out in the open air by your tent having some lovely hot food after being outside all day. Camping is all about getting back to our roots and being in tune with nature, whether you are camping in the hills, the woods or at plush campsite with all the bells and whistles like shower block and social club with a television.

One of the great things is cooking out in the open whether that is by means of a barbecue or a camping stove. But one of the issues us campers come across is how do we keep the food warm? It is not like at home where you can turn the oven down or reheat your stew in the microwave. At camp you either have to eat it one sitting or eat it cold. Or do you? Here are my top five tips on keeping your camping food hot;

  1. Insulate With Cloth And Newspaper. To keep your pans of food hot by placing the pan or saucepan with newspaper or throwing a tea-towel over it will keep it hot for a good extra twenty minutes.
  2. Add Sauce. When you serve your food, boiled vegetables can go cold in a flash; try serving them in a hot sauce. This will add flavour but also keep them hot for a lot longer.
  3. Make a ‘Hot’ box. You don’t have to use your cool box just to keep items cold. You can use it as a hot box. Fill your cool box with some hot air from a kettle then put your pan or saucepan inside, then seal the box. This can keep your food hot even for hours.
  4. Flasks. You don’t have to use a flask just to keep your tea and coffee warm. If you need a sauce hot while you cook your other food and ingredients, pour your sauce into a flask, then seal.
  5. Round up the campers.By getting everyone seated just before dinner is served, this will avoid anyone getting a cold meal. In my experience with a family someone generally ends up with a cold meal of you do not adopt this approach.

It can always be a challenge to keep your food hot when camping especially if you go camping out of season. If you are barbecuing food and if you know that it won’t all get used, it is good to wrap those items of food in foil and store them in your larder. This will help keep the food that much warmer for longer.



Source by Max Webster-Dowsing